TED Radio Hour

Guy Raz explores the emotions, insights, and discoveries that make us human. The TED Radio Hour is a narrative journey through fascinating ideas, astonishing inventions, fresh approaches to old problems, and new ways to think and create.

https://www.npr.org/programs/ted-radio-hour/

Eine durchschnittliche Folge dieses Podcasts dauert 21m. Bisher sind 843 Folge(n) erschienen.
subscribe
share



 

#396: A Father Of High-Speed Trading Thinks We Should Slow Down


Thomas Peterffy's life story includes a typing robot, a proto-iPad, and a vast fortune he amassed as one of the first guys to use computers in financial markets. On today's show, Peterffy tells us his story — and he explains why he's worried about the financial world he helped create. Also on the show: We talk with Simone Foxman of Quartz about high-speed traders paying to get a key financial indicator two seconds before everybody else.


share





 15 June 2013  24m
 
 

#465: Myanmar Opens Up


After decades of isolation, Myanmar is reconnecting with the rest of the world. On today's show, we meet two people who are trying to take advantage of the changes going on there. One is launching a tiny startup. The other works for Coca-Cola — a company that left Myanmar decades ago, and only returned to the country last year. For more, see our stories "Can This Man Bring Silicon Valley To Yangon?" and "How To Sell Coke To People Who Have Never Had A Sip."


share





 12 June 2013  19m
 
 

#464: When A Poor Country Gets A Lot Richer*


*Note: The country is only getting richer on paper, but that change may make a difference in the real world.* People talk about GDP as if it means something solid, as if it's a mathematically derived and agreed upon fact. But in conversations we've had in the last few weeks, we've become more convinced that GDP is a wobbly fact. It's malleable, and it's mushy. GDP can change in a day...


share





 10 June 2013  15m
 
 

#463: How To Get A Country To Trust Its Banks


It's something you can see on every block in most major cities. You probably see it every day and never give a second thought to. But in Yangon, Myanmar, an ATM is a small miracle. For decades, Myanmar was cut off from the rest of the world. There were international sanctions, and no one in the U.S. or Europe did business there. But last year, when the international sanctions started to be lifted, companies like Visa and Mastercard were excited to come in...


share





 05 June 2013  n/a
 
 

#462: When Patents Hit the Podcast


Back in the nineties, Jim Logan started a company called Personal Audio. The concept was simple — people could pick out magazine articles they liked on the internet, and his company would send them a cassette tape of those articles being read out loud. The cassette tapes didn't catch on like Jim hoped, but he had bigger dreams for the idea behind them...


share





 01 June 2013  n/a
 
 

#461: Lawyers, Guns and Money


On today's show: Three short stories from the far flung shores of New Zealand, Ireland and New Jersey. First up, it's no secret that some Americans hide money offshore to avoid paying U.S. taxes. Over the past decade, some 39,000 people have come forward voluntarily to tell the IRS about their offshore money. This group provides a small window into the world of people who are hiding money in offshore havens. Also: how a single page in a report written decades ago by U.S...


share





 29 May 2013  n/a
 
 

#217: The Art Of Living At The Poverty Line


On today's Planet Money, we meet a single mother who makes $16,000 a year — and who managed to fund a vacation at a Caribbean resort with an interest-free loan from one of the world's largest banks. Edith Calzado gets credit cards with teaser zero-percent interest rates — then transfers her balance before the rate ticks up. She signs up for store cards to get discounts — then pays off her bill on time. She gets food stamps and lives in subsidized housing. Her son is doing well in school...


share





 24 May 2013  n/a
 
 

#460: It's Hard To Do Good


In 2010, we reported on a poor town in Haiti, where school was held in a small, one-room church. Planet Money listeners were moved to donate some $3,000, which the principal of the school thought would be enough to build a school. A few months later, the money was gone, and all there was to show for it was a foundation, some concrete blocks and some rock and sand. We thought that would be the end of it...


share





 22 May 2013  23m
 
 

#459: Getting It Right


On today's show: Three short Planet Money stories about trying to figure out what things are really worth. When Lady Gaga writes a song, does that count as economic output? Is a $20 worth $20 in Myanmar (Spoiler: Probably not.) And economists help a young college grad think through what to do with his life. Also: An update on our t-shirt project.


share





 17 May 2013  24m
 
 

#458: Bangladesh's T-Shirt Economy


H&M, Zara, Wal-Mart and JC Penney all buy t-shirts from Bangladesh. Soon, Planet Money will too. As you may have heard, we're making a t-shirt and telling the story of how it's made. We decided a few months ago to work with Jockey to make our t-shirts. Our women's shirt will be made in Colombia. Our men's shirt will be made, in part, in Bangladesh. But horrifying news has been coming out of Bangladesh's apparel industry recently...


share





 15 May 2013  n/a