TED Radio Hour

Guy Raz explores the emotions, insights, and discoveries that make us human. The TED Radio Hour is a narrative journey through fascinating ideas, astonishing inventions, fresh approaches to old problems, and new ways to think and create.

https://www.npr.org/programs/ted-radio-hour/

Eine durchschnittliche Folge dieses Podcasts dauert 21m. Bisher sind 852 Folge(n) erschienen. Dieser Podcast erscheint alle 2 Tage
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#472: The One-Page Plan To Fix Global Warming


Climate change seems like this complicated, intractable problem. But maybe it doesn't have to be. On today's show, we talk to a couple economists about a very simple idea that could solve the climate-change problem: Tax carbon emissions. A carbon tax could be paired with cuts in the income tax. And it would drive down emissions without picking winners or losers, and without creating complicated regulations.


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 12 July 2013  20m
 
 

#471: The Eddie Murphy Rule


On today's show, we talk to commodities traders to answer one of the most important questions in finance: What actually happens at the end of Trading Places? We know something crazy happens on the trading floor. We know that Eddie Murphy and Dan Aykroyd get rich and the Duke brothers lose everything. But how does it all happen? And could it happen in the real world? Also on the show: The "Eddie Murphy Rule" that wound up in the the big financial overhaul law Congress passed in 2010...


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 10 July 2013  26m
 
 

#286: Libertarian Summer Camp


On today's Planet Money, we travel to a place where people are trying to live without government interference. A place where you can use bits of silver to buy uninspected bacon. A place where a 9-year-old will sell you alcohol. It's the Porcupine Freedom Festival, known to its friends as PorcFest. It's the summer festival for people who think we should return to the gold standard and abolish the IRS.


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 05 July 2013  n/a
 
 

#286: Libertarian Summer Camp


On today's Planet Money, we travel to a place where people are trying to live without government interference. A place where you can use bits of silver to buy uninspected bacon. A place where a 9-year-old will sell you alcohol. It's the Porcupine Freedom Festival, known to its friends as PorcFest. It's the summer festival for people who think we should return to the gold standard and abolish the IRS.


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 05 July 2013  n/a
 
 

#470: Killing Fannie Mae


Five years after the financial crisis, the federal government still controls Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, two giant companies that guarantee trillions of dollars in mortgages. This is a huge, little-discussed part of the post-crisis economy. Almost everybody agrees that taxpayers shouldn't be on the hook when their neighbors don't pay their mortgages. But the government doesn't have a clear plan to get out of the mortgage business...


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 03 July 2013  26m
 
 

#469: Rhino Horns And Clean Water


On today's show: Two stories from Kenya. 1. Poachers kill rhinos for their horns. Some economists think legalizing the horns could save the rhinos. **Warning: this story contains graphic audio.** 2. . Getting clean water to people in the developing world isn't just an engineering problem.


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 29 June 2013  n/a
 
 

#468: Kid Rock Vs. The Scalpers


We live in a society full of people who are obsessed with making sure that prices are right and supply meets demand. And then there's the live-music business. Concert tickets are often too cheap, and the supply is too limited. Scalpers are the proof: If tickets were more expensive to begin with, or if venues were bigger, scalpers wouldn't be able to charge more than face value...


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 26 June 2013  n/a
 
 

#467: Tires, Taxes And The Grizz


The price of tires has risen by about 40 percent in the past five years. That's partly because rubber prices have gone up. But it's also due to a tariff that the U.S. on Chinese tire imports. As tire prices have risen, more people have been renting tires rather than buying them outright. And renting tires, it turns out, is often a bad deal in the long run. On today's show: How a celebrated attempt to help one group of people ended quietly hurting a much larger group. Also on the show: The Grizz.


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 22 June 2013  14m
 
 

#466: DIY Finance


Mike Smith lives by himself in a small house in a small town in Kentucky, near the Ohio River. He makes about $1,000 a month, owns his house outright, and doesn't carry any debt. He suspects that his brother and at least one but maybe all of his three grown children have stolen money from him. Over a period of about a year he made exactly six transactions that cost him over $100 — a property tax bill, an insurance payment, a couple big-ticket repairs...


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 19 June 2013  15m
 
 

#396: A Father Of High-Speed Trading Thinks We Should Slow Down


Thomas Peterffy's life story includes a typing robot, a proto-iPad, and a vast fortune he amassed as one of the first guys to use computers in financial markets. On today's show, Peterffy tells us his story — and he explains why he's worried about the financial world he helped create. Also on the show: We talk with Simone Foxman of Quartz about high-speed traders paying to get a key financial indicator two seconds before everybody else.


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 15 June 2013  24m