TED Radio Hour

Guy Raz explores the emotions, insights, and discoveries that make us human. The TED Radio Hour is a narrative journey through fascinating ideas, astonishing inventions, fresh approaches to old problems, and new ways to think and create.

https://www.npr.org/programs/ted-radio-hour/

Eine durchschnittliche Folge dieses Podcasts dauert 21m. Bisher sind 857 Folge(n) erschienen. Dieser Podcast erscheint alle 2 Tage
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#483: Putting The Planet In The Planet Money T-Shirt


The cotton for the Planet Money men's T-shirt was spun into yarn in Indonesia and knit, cut and sewn into shirts in Bangladesh. Last week, we had teams of reporters and photographers in both countries — and we managed to get almost everybody on the phone at once. On today's show, we listen in on that call. Today's special bonus guest: Pietra Rivoli, the author of the book that inspired our T-shirt project. Music: Daft Punk's "Around The World" Find us: Twitter/ Facebook/Spotify/ Tumblr...


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 05 September 2013  n/a
 
 

#433: Holding A Rainforest Hostage? (Update)


Ecuador's Yasuni National Park, a pristine corner of the Amazon rainforest, is home to jaguars, giant otters, and the golden-mantled tamarin. The park also sits on top of hundreds of millions of barrels of oil, worth billions of dollars. The government of Ecuador faces a choice: Should it protect the park, or go for the money? Until very recently, the country was trying to do both. The government said it would leave the rainforest untouched — if rich countries gave billions of dollars...


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 30 August 2013  n/a
 
 

#421: The Birth Of The Dollar Bill


Before the Civil War, there were 8,000 different kinds of money in the United States. Banks printed their own paper money. And, unlike today, a $1 bill wasn't always worth $1. Sometimes people took the bills at face value. Sometimes they accepted them at a discount (a $1 bill might only be worth 90 cents, say.) Sometimes people rejected certain bills altogether. On today's show, we figure out how this world worked...


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 27 August 2013  11m
 
 

#482: Why The U.S. Keeps Sending Weapons To Egypt


As the Egyptian military cracked down on protesters last week, U.S.-made Apache helicopters flew overhead. The Egyptian military also uses American made tanks, fighter jets and bullets. This is the product of the $1.3 billion in military aid the U.S. provides to Egypt every year. In polls, a majority of Egyptians say they want that aid to end. And it's become unpopular among some powerful Americans as well. Yet, so far, the aid hasn't stopped flowing. On today's show: Why it's so hard for the U...


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 24 August 2013  14m
 
 

#481: The Economist's Guide To Drinking While Pregnant


On today's show, we meet a woman who is trying to bring nuance and subtlety to a world of black-and-white rules: pregnancy. Emily Oster is an economist and the author of a book called Expecting Better. Like our own Chana Joffe-Walt — who takes a break from maternity leave to host today's show — Oster found herself confused and frustrated by all the rules of pregnancy. Unlike Chana, Emily Oster decided to read almost every study that had every been conducted on pregnancy and risk...


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 21 August 2013  n/a
 
 

#480: The Charity That Just Gives People Money


GiveDirectly is a charity that just gives money to poor people. The people who get the money can spend it on whatever they want. They never have to pay it back. On today's show, we hear from someone who got money from GiveDirectly, from one of the founder's of the group, and from a few other people in the charity world. But, really, today's show is just a quick introduction...


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 17 August 2013  n/a
 
 

#479: Behind The Label


On today’s show, three stories about what how products and people get branded and what happens when you peel back the label, and try to get the full story.


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 14 August 2013  18m
 
 

#478: Rocky Pipkin, Private Eye Vs. The Raisin Outlaw


In most industries, competitors getting together to restrict the supply of a good would be illegal. But in the raisin world, it's the opposite. Competitors have to work together. They all decide as a group how many raisins to release to the public. What can get you in trouble in raisins, is going against that group.   Raisin farmer, Marvin Horne, is a raisin rebel, a raisin outlaw...


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 10 August 2013  n/a
 
 

#477: Waiting For Robot Nannies


More than half of all Japanese women quit their jobs after giving birth to their first child. That's more than double the rate in the U.S., and it's a problem for Japan's economy. If more women returned to the workforce, it would go a huge way toward boosting growth in the country and solving a big demographic problem — not enough working people to support the nation's retirees. But finding childcare in Japan is even harder than finding childcare in the U.S...


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 07 August 2013  n/a
 
 

Episode 386: The Cost Of Free Doughnuts


Everybody likes free. But free can be dangerous, too. Today's show is sort of the flip side free. It is what happens when you take something that was free — and you give it a price, a decision many Internet companies face today. That is a highly risky move, it turns out. And the damage can be enormous. This week, free of charge, Chana Joffe-Walt and Alex Blumberg tell the story of the Red Cross and free doughnuts — that suddenly weren't free any more...


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 02 August 2013  n/a