TED Radio Hour

Guy Raz explores the emotions, insights, and discoveries that make us human. The TED Radio Hour is a narrative journey through fascinating ideas, astonishing inventions, fresh approaches to old problems, and new ways to think and create.

https://www.npr.org/programs/ted-radio-hour/

Eine durchschnittliche Folge dieses Podcasts dauert 21m. Bisher sind 868 Folge(n) erschienen. Dieser Podcast erscheint alle 2 Tage
subscribe
share



 

recommended podcasts


#490: The Real Economy Of Fantasy Sports


Last year, Americans paid $1.7 billion to play in fantasy sports leagues. Billion! On today's show, we find real businesses sprouting up to profit from the fantasy sports economy. One guy sells insurance that pays off if a (real) player on your (fantasy) team gets hurt; another settles disputes that pop up in fantasy leagues. Also on the show today: When fantasy football is a negative externality in a marriage. (Bonus: The marriage in question involves a member of the Planet Money team...


share





 12 October 2013  n/a
 
 

#189: Why A Dead Shark Costs $12 Million


On today's Planet Money: Why a dead shark costs $12 million, and a photo of steel wool that looks like a tornado costs $1,265. In other words, we wade into the economics of the art world. For more, read Ed Winkleman's blog and check out his gallery. Browse the works of Matthew Albanese, the man behind the steel-wool tornado. And read "Art Investment as Floating Crap Game" by William Baumol, an economist and artist. Note: This episode was originally posted in 2010. Music: Sia's "Clap Your Hands...


share





 09 October 2013  17m
 
 

#489: The Invisible Plumbing Of Our Economy


So we're making a T-shirt and we do this Kickstarter campaign and we raise $590,807 (which, really, we can't thank you enough). It turns out the money collected on Kickstarter is handled by Amazon. Great, we figure: This is the company that will sell you anything on the planet and get it you you the next day. And what we need in this case isn't even a thing, really. We just need Amazon's bank to send money electronically to a checking account at Chase bank...


share





 05 October 2013  n/a
 
 

#352: The High-Tech Cow


On today's show, we visit Fulper Farms, a family-run dairy in New Jersey. It's a bucolic setting — white farmhouse, rolling hills, etc. But behind that peaceful image lies all the roiling tension, rising inequality and economic volatility of the 21st-century economy. We meet Claudia, the prized, high-tech cow. And we learn why even a barn full of Claudias wouldn't be enough to keep a family-run dairy afloat...


share





 02 October 2013  22m
 
 

#488: The Secret History Of Your Cable Bill


If you have cable, your bill has probably doubled over the past decade. The rise is largely driven by fees for channels you have to pay for, whether you want them or not. ESPN alone is costing you more than $5 a month — even if you never watch it...


share





 28 September 2013  n/a
 
 

#371: Where Dollar Bills Come From


Every single dollar bill in the world — every $20, every $100, everything — is printed on paper made at one small mill in Massachusetts. That's been the case for 130 years. On today's show, we visit the mill. We hear the story of the guy who jumped out a hotel window to win the government contract to print all that paper. And we ask: Will anybody be using paper money in 50 years? Subscribe. Music: Temper Trap's "Sweet Disposition." Find us: Twitter/ Facebook/ Spotify/ Tumblr.


share





 26 September 2013  15m
 
 

#487: The Trouble With The Poverty Line


According to the government, there are 46.5 million Americans who live below the poverty line. In other words, that's how many people are officially poor. But pretty much everyone who studies poverty agrees: The way we arrive at this figure is completely wrong. On today's show, we figure out how we got here, why still measure poverty in a way that so many people agree is wrong, and how could we do it better.


share





 21 September 2013  12m
 
 

#369: If Teens Ran The Fed


We're in a gym full of high school students. The gym is at the headquarters of the New York Federal Reserve, just a few blocks from Wall Street. The students are here for the High School Fed Challenge. If you're a high school student and you dream of holding the U.S. economy in the palm of your hand — if you want the power to control interest rates and to print money out of thin air — the Fed Challenge is for you...


share





 18 September 2013  n/a
 
 

#486: Crisis Revisited


Five years ago this month, the financial crisis hit its most intense moment. One giant company after another went bust or was rescued at the last minute, as the government launched a wave of bailouts. Another momentous thing happened five years ago this week: The Planet Money podcast came into being. Today, we replay key moments from some of our first shows, when it seemed like the entire economy could seize up at any moment...


share





 14 September 2013  24m
 
 

#485: What's Your Major?


Sure, some college degrees lead to higher paying jobs than others. But what's shocking — at least, it was shocking to us — is just how big the gap can be. The most lucrative majors typically lead to jobs with salaries over $100,000 a year. The least lucrative lead to salaries of around $30,000. On today's show, we run the numbers. We talk to people who majored in the most- and least-lucrative subjects...


share





 12 September 2013  17m