Ideas

IDEAS is a deep-dive into contemporary thought and intellectual history. No topic is off-limits. In the age of clickbait and superficial headlines, it's for people who like to think.

http://www.cbc.ca/radio/podcasts/documentaries/the-best-of-ideas/

Eine durchschnittliche Folge dieses Podcasts dauert 54m. Bisher sind 734 Folge(n) erschienen. Dieser Podcast erscheint täglich
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“You Might Need Some Richard Rorty”


"He is a nemesis to many, and is claimed as a friend by only very few," wrote Eduardo Mendieta about Richard Rorty, the most quoted, most criticized, and most widely read of recent U.S. philosophers. Rorty died in 2007, but a passionate crew of 'Rortyans' now devote themselves to keeping his name alive, challenging what they see as the many misinterpretations of his work...


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   54m
 
 

Ought vs. Is: Reclaiming nature as a moral guide


Throughout the centuries, politicians, theologians and philosophers have pointed to nature as a way to guide our actions and beliefs. The equivalence between "unnatural" and "bad" seems to be as durable as ever. But philosophical anthropologist Lorraine Daston doesn't think using "nature" as a guide is necessarily all bad.


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   54m
 
 

The Pulpit, Power and Politics: Evangelicalism's thumbprint on America


The grip conservative evangelicalism has on American social and political life is hard to overestimate. Committed Christian and author Jemar Tisby was joined by historians of religion John Fea and Molly Worthen to help answer the question: what exactly is the relationship between conservative evangelicalism and America today?


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   54m
 
 

The Relativity Revolution: Alberta Einstein and the making of the modern world


In 1905, a patent office clerk working in Bern, Switzerland, published a series of academic papers on physics that revolutionized physics and our thinking about space and time, mass and energy. Albert Einstein's ideas were a great leap forward, providing the solution to some crucial problems in physics. A panel discussion from the 2019 Stratford Festival with philosophers, Chris Smeenk and Doreen Fraser, along with theoretical physicist, Bianca Dittrich.


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   54m
 
 

How To Feed The World


David Nabarro, a longtime advisor to the UN on sustainable development, says climate change is forcing us to rethink how our food systems work and figure out the best way to get people the food they need without further degrading the environment.


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   54m
 
 

In the Sweet By and By: Atheist Edition


What happens when atheists engage sincerely with Christian apologists and evangelical creationists -- and vice versa? A lot, in fact; and most of it is good.


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   54m
 
 

Canada as a middle power in an upended world: Time for a foreign policy reset?


As chaotic and unpredictable as the world can be, there was — at least for a time — an international rules-based order, underpinned by US leadership that ensured at least a semblance of stability. That order is in decline. So what's a middle power like Canada to do? What can it do? The Canadian International Council and Global Canada convened a discussion in Toronto, where some answers were found, both by looking back through history and in imagining a possible future.


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   54m
 
 

From God to the Apocalypse: Deserts in literature


Deserts cover nearly a third of the landmass of the earth, but we have a very troubled relationship with them. Sometimes we consider them empty wastelands, sometimes beautiful landscapes. Sometimes they’re holy, and sometimes god-forsaken. IDEAS producer Matthew Lazin-Ryder explores our troubled relationship with deserts.


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   54m
 
 

Machines of Chance: How casino culture plays with us


Casinos: if the house always wins, why do we play? How the universal temptations of both vice and risk — not to mention the language of Brexit — feed into the 24/7 slot machine of our “casino culture.”


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   54m
 
 

Does the deep state exist?


The term 'deep state' has been used by both the political left and the right. In broad strokes, it means official leaders of a country aren't the real leaders — that hidden away in bureaucracies or other corridors of power are the real lever-pullers. Investigative journalist, Bruce Livesey examines the origins of the conflicted term, and where it's in operation today.


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   54m